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🎨 Van Gogh: painting, love and purpose

How does this fit in?

The above brainpickings article, which summarizes a letter sent by Vincent Van Gogh to his brother in 1879, has been selected to help you deepen your own approach to:

  1. Asking better questions
  2. Thinking deeply about your intention
  3. How you define both 'value' and 'trust'
  4. Think about what you, personally, are doing here? What is your question?

Full Brief

"Improvement in my life — should I not desire it or should I not be in need of improvement? I really want to improve. But it’s precisely because I yearn for it that I’m afraid of remedies that are worse than the disease."

  • How do we handle this tension between improving and being joyfully who we already are?

"Such idling is really a rather strange sort of idling. It’s rather difficult for me to defend myself on this score, but I would be sorry if you couldn’t eventually see this in a different light."

  • Tinkering as a better way of being. This is not about building more products for 'consumers' - it's about using new trust spaces to commune in a different and digital sense.

"Such a person doesn’t always know himself what he could do, but he feels by instinct, I’m good for something, even so! I feel I have a raison d’être! I know that I could be a quite different man! For what then could I be of use, for what could I serve! There’s something within me, so what is it!"

  • What is in your heart of hearts? You may wonder how relevant this question is, but we cannot build a better web if we do not first understand what it might mean to be better ourselves. And that requires deep enquiry into the nature of self: there is no other way.

"But what’s your ultimate goal, you’ll say. The goal will become clearer, will take shape slowly and surely, as the croquis becomes a sketch and the sketch a painting, as one works more seriously, as one digs deeper into the originally vague idea, the first fugitive, passing thought."

  • Do you trust the inner voice? Again, a seemingly abstract question with profound implications for what we actually, in practice, understand trust to be; which is then directly reflected in the kinds of products we build.

"I’m always inclined to believe that the best way of knowing is to love a great deal. Love that friend, that person, that thing, whatever you like, you’ll be on the right path to knowing more thoroughly, afterwards; that’s what I say to myself. But you must love with a high, serious intimate sympathy, with a will, with intelligence, and you must always seek to know more thoroughly, better, and more."


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